Oldest language in the world list – Shocking to know about the Dravidian language family dates back 4,500 years.

TAMIL Oldest language in the world
TAMIL Oldest language in the world

The four main Dravidian languages — Kannada, Malayalam, Tamil, and Telugu — have centuries-old literary histories, with Tamil dating back the farthest, according to experts.

According to a research, the Dravidian language family, which includes 80 variants spoken by approximately 220 million people in southern and central India, began about 4,500 years ago.

This estimate is based on new language analysis conducted by an international team of researchers from Germany’s Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History and India’s Wildlife Institute of Dehradun.

The researchers used information gathered directly from native speakers of all previously identified Dravidian subgroups. The findings, which were published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, are consistent with previous linguistic and archaeological investigations.

South Asia, which stretches from Afghanistan to Bangladesh in the east, is home to at least 600 languages from six broad language families, including Dravidian, Indo-European, and Sino-Tibetan.

The Dravidian language family, which includes over 80 linguistic variants (including languages and dialects), is now spoken by approximately 220 million people, primarily in southern and central India and neighboring countries.

The Dravidian language family’s four main languages — Kannada, Malayalam, Tamil, and Telugu — have centuries-long literary histories, with Tamil having the longest, according to experts. Sino-Tibetan.

Tamil, like Sanskrit, is a classical language, but unlike Sanskrit, there is continuity between its ancient and current forms, as evidenced by inscriptions, poetry, secular and religious writings and songs, according to the researchers.

Tamil art
Tamil art

“Understanding prehistory in Eurasia requires an understanding of the Dravidian languages, since they influenced other language groups,” said Annemarie Verkerk of the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History.

The actual geographical origin of the Dravidian language, as well as its dispersion over time, are unknown.

The Dravidians are inhabitants of the Indian subcontinent, according to the study community, and were there before the Indo-Aryans (Indo-European speakers) arrived in India some 3,500 years ago.

According to the researchers, Dravidian languages were likely far more widely spoken in the west in the past than they are now.

They investigated the historical links of 20 Dravidian variations in attempt to answer issues concerning when and where the Dravidian languages arose.

Vishnupriya Kolipakam of the Wildlife Institute of India gathered current first-hand data from local speakers of a varied sample of Dravidian languages, representing all of the previously identified Dravidian subgroups.

The researchers employed advanced statistical methods to calculate the age and sub-grouping of the Dravidian language family, which they estimated to be around 4,000-4,500 years old.

While this estimate is consistent with earlier linguistic research, it is a more reliable conclusion because it was found in the majority of the statistical models of evolution investigated in this work.

This period also corresponds to archaeological conclusions, which had previously put the diversification of Dravidian into North, Central, and South branches at this era, coinciding with the beginnings of cultural advances seen in the archaeological record.

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